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St. Jacques De L' Achigan to St Onezime, Canada

ST. JACQUES DE L' ACHIGAN. a post village and parish of Quebec, co. of Montcalm, on the River Lac Oureau, 13 miles from L'Assomption. The village contains a church, a convent, a brewery and several stores. Pop. 800; of parish 2,754.

ST. JACQUES LE MINEUR, a post Village and p in-h in Laprairie co., Que., 5 miles from L'Acadie. The village contains 4 store3 and 3 hotels. Pop. 500; of parish 1,835.

ST. JAMES, a post office in the district of Selkirk, Man., on the River Assiniboine, 5 miles from Fort Carry.

ST. JAMES, a parish in Charlotte co., N.B., 46 miles from St. Stephen. Pop. 2,

ST. JAMES PARK, a rapidly improving suburb of the city of London, Middlesex co., Ont. It contains a first class bakery, with 2 ovens of the most improved construction, an Episcopal church, 6 hotels, and 6 stores. A prominent establishment is the St. James Park nurseries, 80 acres in extent, ½ a mile from the centre of the city. The Great Western railway runs past the grounds. Pop. 1,200.

ST. JANVIER, a post village and parish in Terrebonne co., Que., 2d miles from Montreal. The village contains a telegraph office and 2 stores. Pop of parish 1,300.

ST. JEAN BAPTISTE DE MONTREAL, an incorporated village of Quebec, co. of Hochelaga, 1 mile from Montreal, of which it may almost be considered a suburb. It has a telegraph office, a fine market, a number of stores, several hotels, and many good buildings Pop. 4,408.

ST. JEAN BAPTISTE DE ROUVILLE, a thriving post village, and parish in Rouville co., Que., on the Littie River Huron 9 miles from St. Hilaire Station It contains several Stores and mills. Pop. 1,953.

ST. JEAN CHRYS03TOME DE CHATEAUGUAY, formerly called EDWARDSTOWN, a flourishing post village and parish in Chateauguay co., Que., at the confluence of the English and Black Rivers, 13 miles from St. Remi. The village contains 2 churches, 5 hotels, a brickfield, a tannery, several mills, and 6 stores. Pop. 1,000; of parish 4,291.

ST. JEAN CHRYSOSTOME DE LEVIS, a post village and parish in Levis co., Que., on the G. T. R., 13 miles from Quebec. The village contain a saw and grist mills, and several stores. Pop. 300; of parish 1,707.

ST. JEAN DE DIEU, Temiscouata co., Que. See Begon.

ST. JEAN DE MATHA, a post village and parish in Joliette co., Que., on the River L'Assomption, 21 miles from Joliette. The village contains 7 sawmills, 3 grist mills, a carding and fuelling mill, and several stores. Pop 400; of parish 2,293.

ST. JEAN DESCHAILLONS. a post village and parish in Lotbiniere co., Que., on the River St. Lawrence, 57 miles S.W. of Quebec. The village contains 3 saw mills, 3 grist mills, and 7 or 8 stores. Pop. 400; of parish 2,158.

ST. JEAN D'ORLEANS, a post village and parish in Montmorency co., Que , on the Island of Orleans, 22 miles below Quebec. Pop. 1,436.

ST. JEAN PORT JOLI, a post village of Quebec, capital of the co. of L'Islet, on the S shore of the St. Lawrence, and on the G. T. R, 71 miles N.E. of Quebec. It contains a telegraph office, a church, a tannery, and about 10 stores. Pop. 400; of parish 2,436

ST. JEROME an incorporated village of Quebec, capital of the co. of Terrebonne, on the North River or Riviere du Nord, 33 miles N. of Montreal. It contains, besides the county buildings, a church, a woolen factory, several saw and grist mills, a telegraph office, and a number of stores. There are peat bogs in the vicinity Pop 1,159.

ST. JEROME DU LAC ST. JEAN, a village in Chicoutimi co., Que., 55 miles from Chicoutimi It contains saw and grist mills Pop 120.

ST. JOACHIM, a post village and parish in Montmorency co., Que., on the N. shore of the St. Lawrence, 27 miles from Quebec. It contains a church and 5 or 6 stores Pop 923.

ST. JOACHIM, Chateauguay co., Que. See Chateauguay.

ST JOACHIM DE SHEFFORD, a post village and parish in Shelford co., Que., 9 miles from Waterloo. Pop. 3,542

ST. JOHN, a city and seaport of New Brunswick, the commercial metropolis of the province, and capital of the co. of St. John, is picturesquely situated at the mouth of a river of its own name, on a rocky peninsula projecting into the harbor, 190 miles N.W. of Halifax, via Annapolis, or 276 miles, via Intercolonial railway, and 761 miles S.E. of Montreal. Lat. 45° 14 6' N., lon. 66° 3' 30' W. (Partridge Island light.)

The city is regularly laid out and well built It stands on a declivity, and when approach d from the sea has an imposing appearance. The whole of the elevated portion of the city consists of solid rock, which, for the purpose of forming tolerable streets, has had in some places to be excavated to a depth of 30 and 40 feet.

The buildings are chiefly of brick and Stone, and many of the public edifices have an elegant appearance. The principal ones are St. Mary's Cathedral, (R.C.,) Lunatic Asylum, City Hospital, Court House and Gaol, Marine Hospital, Penitentiary, Alms House, Male Orphan Asylum, Academy of Music, Dramatic Lyceum, Mechanics' Institute, Skating Rink, and the Barracks.

There are 34 places of worship in St. John, viz: Church of England 8; Roman Catholic 3; Presbyterian 7; Wesleyan Methodist6; Bapust9; Congregational 1.

The educational institutions comprise a grammar school, a Madras school, and a number of public and private schools.

St. John has a number of religious and charitable societies, a public library, 2 banks and 2 branch banks, 1 savings bank, an efficient fire brigade, fire alarm telegraph, 4 daily and several weekly newspapers, and a number of first class hotels.

The thriving suburb of Carleton, on the opposite side of the harbor, is included within the city corporation.

The harbor of St. John is capacious, safe and never obstructed by ice. Its entrance, about 2 miles S. of the city, is protected by Partridge Island, on which are a quarantine hospital and a lighthouse, the lantern 166 feet above the level of the sea. The passage W. of the island has in it 10 feet of water, that to the E. 16 feet, and abreast of the city there are from 8 to 22 fathoms; both sides of the entrance are com-posed of sharp rocks, which become dry at low water. About J of a mile N. off a lighthouse is a vertical beacon, fixed on the edge of a rocky ledge which forms the W. side of the channel and has deep water close to it. On the E. side of the channel, below the town, a breakwater has been constructed to intercept the violence of the waves, occasioned by southerly gales. The entrance of the River St. John into the harbor, about ¾ miles above the city, is through a rocky gorge, 90 yards wide and 400 yards long, occasioning very remarkable falls. The ordinary rise of the tide in the harbor is 21 feet; at the vernal equinox it rises 25 feet. At low water, the waters of the river are about 12 feet higher than those of the harbor, at high water the waters of the harbor are 5 feet higher than those of the river, hence the phenomena of a fall outwards and inwards at every tide. Above the falls the tide seldom rises more than 4 fret. When the waters of the harbor and river are on a level vessels can pass the falls, and this can be effected only during a period of 15 or 20 minutes au each ebb and flow of the tide At times of great freshets, occasioned by the sudden melting of the snow, the tides do not rise to the level of the river, and consequently it is not possible for vessels to ascend the fall. The depth of the fall is about 17 feet. Spanning the rocky gorge, about 100 feet above low water, is a magnificent suspension bridge 640 feet in length. Number of dwellings in St. John in 1872, 3,479.

St. John is the entrepot of a wide extent of country, abounding in agricultural resources, minerals and valuable timber. Is admirable situation at the mouth of one of the largest rivers in North America, with a harbor open all the year round, with regular steam communication with all the main ports of Nova Scotia, and the northern por-tion of the United States, with first class railways running from it in every direction, with extensive maritime and manufacturing interests, ensures the certainty of its becoming a city of the greatest commercial importance.

St. John has manufactories of iron castings, steam engines, machinery, edge tools, nails, cotton and woolen goods, boots and shoes, leather, wooden ware, soap and candles, carriages, locomotives, agricultural implements, lumber, paper, sugar boxes, &c. Its most important branch of industry, however, is shipbuilding. The number of vessels built in 1872 was 74 (tons 28,914).

The number of arrivals at St. John in 1872 was 1,562 (tons 420,800). and the clearances 1,527 (tons 456,967 ) Total value of imports $57,534,099; export; $3,650,181; viz., products of the forest $2,007,831; of the fisheries $138,843; of the mines $27,182; animals and their products $75,544; agricultural products $21,235; and manufactures $536,672, of which sugar boxes represent $508,753.

Between 600 and 900 men are yearly engaged in the fisheries in the harbor of St. John. Salmon, shad, herrings, alewives, halibut and haddock are taken in large quantities.

The streets of St. John are lighted with gas, and the city is well supplied with water from a lake 4 miles in rear of the city.

The railway system of New Brunswick centers at St. John. The great Intercolonial connects the City with Nova Scotia and the Gulf of St. Lawrence, and the European and North American railway (consolidated) connects it with the United States. The head offices of the former are at Moncton and of the latter at Bangor, Me.

Although settlements have been made in Acadia for many years no mention is made of St. John until 1604 when the French explorer, Champlain, pilot of an expedition commanded by M. de Monts, after coasting along the shores of Nova Scotia, crossed the Bay of Fundy, a id discovered the magnificent river, which he named St. John. At that time it was called by the Aborigines, Ouangondy. No settlement was made until 1635, when a French nobleman named Charles St. Etienne, Lord of Latour, commenced the erection of a pallisade fort opposite Navy Island, in the harbor of St. John. De la Latour, having been appointed Lieutenant General, lived here for a long time with a large number of retainers and soldiers, and traded in furs with the Indians. But, having fallen into disfavor with the French King, was ordered to surrender his fort and commission; this he refused to do, and an expedition under the command of one D'Aulnay Charnisay, was sent out in 1643 to eject him. D'Aulnay blockaded the fort, but Latour, having got assistance of men and ships from Governor Winthrop, of Boston, drove his fleet back to Port Royal (now Annapolis, N.S.), where a number of his vessels were driven ashore and destroyed. Again, in 1645, D'Aulnay attacked the fort, and Latour, being absent with a number of his men, his lady took command, and defended it with so much skill and perseverance that the fleet was compelled to withdraw. Having received reinforcements, D'Aulnay shortly afterwards returned, and again attacked the fort by land. After three days spent in several unsuccessful attacks, a Swiss sentry, who had been bribed, betrayed the garrison, and allowed the enemies to scale the walls. Madame Latour personally headed her little band of fifty men, and heroically attacked the invaders; but seeing how hopeless was success, she consented to terms of peace, afforded by D'Aulnay, if she would surrender the fort. He, immediately upon getting possession, disregarded all the conditions agreed to, hung the whole garrison, and compelled this noble woman, with a rope around her neck, to witness the execution; she, a few days afterwards, died of a broken heart. In 1650, Latour re-turned to St. John, and received from the widow of D'Aulnay ,who had died in the meantime, the possession of his old fort. In 1653 they were married, and he once more held peaceable control of his former lands as well as those of his deceased rival. In 1654 an expedition was sent by Oliver Cromwell from England, which captured Acadia from the French, and Latour was once more deprived of his property and possession. In 1657, Acadia was ceded to France by the treaty of Breda, but no settlement of importance was made until the year 1749, when a fort was built at the mouth of the Nerepis river, about 10 miles from the city of St. John. In 1745, the French were again driven out by the English; and in 1758, a garrison was established at St. John, under the command of Colonel Moncton. In 1764, the first English settlers came to New Brunswick, but no permanent settlement was made until 1783, whe i the Royalists arrived and founded the present city of St. John. It was created a town by Royal Charter in 1785.

St. John (city and county) retur is 3 members to the House of Commons and 6 to the Provincial Legislature. Pop. of city in 1861, 27,317; in 1871, 28,805.

ST. JOHN, a maritime county of New Brunswick, bordering on the Bay of Fundy, and intersected by the River St. John, which, at its mouth, forms one of the finest harbors on the coast. It is also drained by the Kennebaccasis and other rivers. The surface is agreeably diversified with hills and valleys. The soil is fertile and agriculture has made some advances; the chief industry of the inhabitants, however, is directed to commerce, shipbuilding and the fisheries. St. John is the most populous county in the province. Area 374,810 acres. Capital, St. John. Pop. 52,120.

ST. JOHNS, a county in the S.W. part of Quebec bordering on the Richelieu river, comprises an area of 112,106 acres. It is intersected by the Grand Trunk railway (Rouse's Point division). Capital, St. Johns. Pop. 12,122.

ST. JOHN'S, the most eastern sea-port and city of North America, capital of Newfoundland, near the extremity of the easternmost of the numerous pen-sulas which project from the E, portion of the island, 1,665 miles W. by S. of Galway, Ireland, this being the shortest distance between any two seaports of Europe and America, 1,076 miles N. E. of Montreal. Lat. 47° 33' 6" W., lat. 52° 3' W.

The harbor is one of the very best. It is enclosed by two mountains, between the E. points of which is the entrance, called "the Narrows," only 95 fathoms wide in its narrowest part and 100 fathoms long. This entrance is defended by several batteries and fortifications, and could be made impregnable. It has 12 fathoms water in mid channel, but only one vessel can pass at a time. Within there is ample space for shipping in good anchorage with perfect shelter. There are no perceptible tides. A light on Cape Spear is visible 30 miles at sea; there is also a harbor light. In foggy weather an 18 pounder gun is fired every half hour, enabling vessels to enter "the Narrows" at all times, the water being deep and the shore bold.

The town is situated on an acclivity, and consists chiefly of one street, about 1½ miles in length, rather irregularly built, but containing many good shops and stores, the former mostly of stone. The houses in this part of the town are small and mostly of brick, but in the upper part they are of wood, and are very awkwardly disposed. St. John, however, has, upon the whole, been greatly improved since the great fire of 1846, both as regards the style of building and the width and regularity of the streets. It is lighted with gas and well supplied with water brought from a pond on an adjoining eminence called Signal Hill.

The public buildings, exclusive of the churches; are the Government House, a large plain structure erected at a cost of $240,000; House of Assembly, hospital, penitentiary, poor house and banks.

There are eight places of worship, 3 Episcopal, 1 Roman Catholic, 1 Established Church of Scotland, 1 Free Church, 1 Wesleyan and 1 Congregational, St. Join's Church in a line Cathedral erected for the Roman Catholics at a cost of $800,000. The Episcopal Cathedral is also a fine edifice. It cost over $120,000.

The educational institutions of St. John's comprise two schools in connection with the Church of England, one belonging to the Wesleyan Church, and two to the Roman Catholic Church.

There are several religious and benevolent societies, a mechanics institute, a reading room, library and museum attached; an agricultural society, 2 foundries, 2 breweries, 2 tanneries, 1 rope factory, 1 block factory, 1 boot and shoe factory, 1 cabinet factory, 1 saw mill. 3 biscuit factories, each using 20,000 brls. of flour annually, several oil refineries, and a large factory occupied for making nets.

The trade of St. John consists chiefly in supplying the fishermen with clothing, provisions, and fishing and hunting gear. During the spring season the harbor is thronged with merchant vessels from almost all parts of the world with goods and provisions required in the fishery. The value of imports in 1872 was$6,716,068; exports, chiefly fish and seal oil, $5,707,002. The number of vessel that arrived at St. John's in 1872 was 1,253; cleared 933.

The British Government was established at St John's as ea ly as 1582 by the gallant Sir Humphrey Gilbert. The French subsequently took possession, but after a series of troubles the island in 1762 again fell into the hands of the British, and has ever since remained in their posession.

Pop. in 1812, 3,420: in 1846, 19,000; in 1852, 21,000; in 1869, 22,553.

ST. JOHNS, formerly DORCHESTER, an incorporated town of Quebec, capital of the co. of St. Johns, on the River Richelieu, 27 miles S E. of Montreal, with which it is connected by railway. The cars of 4 railway companies pass through here daily, viz: The Grand Trunk railway to and from Rouse's Point; the Vermont Central railway to and from Boston and New York; the Stanstead, Shefford and Chambly railway to and from Waterloo; and the South Eastern Railway to and from Newport St. Johns contains 4 or 5 churches, 1 branch bank, 2 newspaper offices, about 40 stores, and has manufactories of iron castings, leather, earthenware, &c. There are also saw, grist and planing mills, brickfields, 2 breweries, barracks, lunatic asylum, town hall, Arc. It is connected with St. Athanase, on the opposite side of the Richelieu, by a fine bridge. St. Johns has a largo trade in lumber, grain and country produce. The head offices of the St. Johns Bank are here. Total value of imports for 1872 $499,433; exports $6,452,729. Pop. 3,022.

ST. JOHNS, Middlesex co., Out. See Arva.

ST. JOHNS WEST, a post village in Welland co., Out., 7 miles from St. Catharines, it contains 2 stores, a woolen mill and saw and grist mills. Pop. 150.

ST. JOSEPH, an island of Ontario, in the channel between Lakes Superior and Huron. Lat.46° 15 N., lon. 84° 10' W. Length and breadth about 15 miles each.

ST. JOSEPH, a post village in Westmorland co., N.B., 3 miles from Memramcook. It is the seat of St. Joseph de Memramcook College, with 8 professors, and an average yearly attendance of 90 pupils. Pop. 400.

ST, JOSEPH, a settlement in Antigonish co., N.S., 8 miles from Antigonish. Pop. 200.

ST. JOSEPH DE BEAUCE, a thriving post village and parish in Beauce co., Que., 42i miles from Quebec. The village contains 3 saw mills, 3 grist mills and 5 or 6 stores. Copper ore is found in the vicinity. Pop. 450; of parish 2,981.

ST. JOSEPH DE LEVIS, Levis co., Que. Sec Lauzon.

ST. JOSEPH D'ELY, Shefford co.; Que. See Valcourt.

ST. JOSEPH DE MASKINONGE, Maskinonge co , Que. See Maskinonge.

ST. JOSEPH DU LAC. a post village and parish in the co. of Two Mountains, Que., near the Lake of Two Mountains, 30 miles from Montreal. Pop. 1,292.

ST. JUDE, a post village in St. Hyacinthe co., Que., 13½ miles from St. Hyacinthe. It contains a tannery, saw, grist and carding mills, and several stores. Pop. 603.

ST. JULIENS, a fishing settlement on the French shore, Nfld., 5 miles from Croque. Pop. 40.

ST. JUST, Haldimand co., Ont. See Hullsville.

ST. JUSTIN, a post village and parish in Maskinonge co., Que., 2 miles from Maskinonge. The village contains a church, a saw mill and 3 stores. Pop. 225; of parish 1,528.

ST. KYRAN'S, a fishing settlement on the W. side of Placentia Bay, Nfld., 23 miles from Placentia. Pop. 30.

ST. LAMBERT, a post Tillage of Quebec, co. of Chambly, on the St. Lawrence, at the east end of the Victoria Bridge, and at the western terminus of the Montreal, Chambly and Sorel railway, l½ miles from Montreal. Pop. 400.

ST. LAMBERT DE LAUZON, a post village and seigniory in Levis co., Que , 11 miles from St. Henri. It contains several stores and mills. Pop. 1,563.

ST. LAURENT, formerly INDIAN MISSION, a post village in the district of Marquette, Man., on the borders of Lake Manitoba, 60 miles from Fort Garry. It contains a Roman Catholic church, and 2 stores. Pop. 167.

ST. LAURENT DE MONTREAL, a thriving post village and parish in Jacques Carrier co., Que., on the Island of .Montreal, 7 miles from Montreal. The village contains a church, a college, a convent, and several stores and hotels. Pop. 500; of parish 2,911.

ST. LAURENT D'ORLEANS, a post village and parish in Montmorency co., Que., on the Island of Orleans, in the St. Lawrence, 14 miles N.E. of Quebec. Pup. 993.

ST. LAZARE, a post village and parish in Bellechasse co., Que., 27 miles E. of Quebec. The village contains 2 saw mills, 3 grist mills, and 4 stores. Pop. 300. of parish 2,003.

ST. LEON, a post village and parish in Maskinonge co., Que., 5 miles from River du Loup en haut. The little Riviere du Loup passes through the parish. The village contains some excellent mineral springs, and several stores, a saw and grist mill, and 2 tanneries. Pop. 400; of parish 1,801.

ST. LEON, Dorchester co., Que. See Standon.

ST. LEONARD, a post village and parish in Nicolet co., Que., on the River Nicolet, 9 miles from Acton. It contains 1 store and a saw mill. Pop. 747.

ST. LEONARD, a post village and parish in Victoria co., N.B., 7 miles from Grand Falls. Pop. 1,997.

ST. LEONARD'S HILL, a post village in Bagot co., Que., 10 miles from Acton. Pop. 100.

ST. LIBOIRE, a post village in Bagot co., Que., on the G. T. R , 44J miles from Montreal. It contains 2 stores. Pop. 150; of parish 1.429.

ST. LIGUORI, a post village and parish it Montcalm co., Que., on the River Lac Ouarcau, 39 miles N. of Montreal. It contains a church, a convent, 3 stores, and saw, grist and carding mills. Pop. 1,498.

ST. LIN, a flourishing post village in L' Assumption co., Que., on the River L' Achigan, and on the Montreal and Laurentian railway, 30 miles from Montreal. It contains a church, a carding mill, saw and grist mills, a telegraph office, several stores, a race course, and excellent quarries, and has a large trade in lumber, grain and country produce. The houses are supplied with pure water from an aqueduct built by an enterprising French Canadian, Joseph Gariepy. Pop. 800; of parish 2,097.

ST. LOUIS, Kent co., N.B. See Palmerston.

ST. LOUIS DE BLANDFORD, Arthabaska CO., Que. See Blandford.

ST LOUIS DE GONZAGUE, formerly GEORGETOWN, a thriving post village in Beauharnois co., Que., on the River St. Louis, 10 miles from Beauharnois, 35 miles from Montréal. It contains a church, a convent, a saw mill, a grist mill, and 5 or 6 stores. Pop. 700; of parish 3,172.

ST. LOUIS DE MANTAWA, Joliette co., Que. See St. Zenon.

ST. LUC, Champlain co., Que. See Vincennes.

ST. LUC, a post village and parish in St. Johns co., Que., 6 miles from St. Johns. Pop. 800.

ST. LUCE, a post village and parish in Rimouski co., Que., on the shore of the St Lawrence, 75 miles below Riviere du Loup era bas. It contains 5 stores. Pop. 1,774

ST. LUNAIRE, a fishing settlement on the French shore, Nfld., 32 miles from Croque. Pop. 30.

ST. MACHOUAN, a village in Chicoutimi co., Que., on Lake St. John, 60 miles from Chicoutimi. Pop. 70.

ST. MAGLOIRE, a post village in Bellechasse co., Que., GO miles from Quebec. Pop. 75.

ST. MALACHIE, or EAST FRAMPTON, a post village and parish in Dorchester co., Que., 20 miles from St. Henri. It contains 3 stores, and saw and grist mills. Pop. 1,106.

ST. MALACHIE D'ORMSTOWN, Chateauguay co., Que. See Ormstown.

ST. MALO, a post village and parish in Compton co., Que., 30 miles from Coaticook. Pop. 250.

ST. MARC, a post village and parish in Vercheres co., Que., on the River Richelieu, 31 miles from Montreal. The village contains a foundry and several stores. Pop. 500; of parish 1,117.

ST. MARCEL, a post village and parish in Richelieu co., Que., on the River Yamaska, 18 miles from St. Hyacinthe. Pop. 1,222.

ST. MARGARET'S, a post village in Kings co., P.E.I. Pop. 50.

ST. MARGARET'S BAY, a post village in Halifax co., N.S., 22 miles from Halifax. It contains 2 stores and 3 hotels. Pop. 500.

ST. MARTIN, a post village and parish in Laval co., Que., on Isle Jesus, 12 miles from Montreal. It contains an hotel and 3 stores. Pop. 2,747.

SL MARTINS, or QUACO, a maritime village in St. John co., N.B., on the Bay of Fundy, 16 miles from Ossekeag. It contains several scores, hotels and mills. Shipbuilding is largely engaged in. Pop. 1,000.

ST. MARTINS, a post village 3 miles from the above. Pop. 400.

ST. MARYS, a cluster of small islands in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, on the S. coast of Labrador. Lat. 50° 20' N., Ion. 60° W.

ST. MARYS, an incorporated town of Ontario, co. of Perth, on a branch of the River Thames, and on the G. T. R., 98£ miles from Toronto, 22 miles from London. It contains churches of 6 or 7 denominations, 1 branch bank, 2 news-paper offices, 2 telegraph offices, several hotels, a number of good stores, and manufactories of iron castings, agricultural implements, leather, woolens, &c, also saw, grist and planing mills, and excellent limestone quarries. Pop. 3,120.

ST. MARYS, an island in Lake St. Clair, 25 miles from Windsor, Out.

ST. MARYS, a post village in Kent co., N.B., on the Buctouche river, 7 miles from Buctouche. It contains 2 churches, 5 stores, 6 saw mills and 2 grist mills. About 8 miles from this place a company is working a gas coal mine. Pop. 200.

ST. MARYS, a post town and port of entry of Newfoundland, district of Placentia and St. Marys, 65 miles from St. John's. It possesses a fine harbor, and is an important fishing station. Pop. 650.

ST. MARYS, a settlement in Gloucester co.. N.B., on Shippegan Island, G miles from Lameque. Pop. 100.

ST. MARYS BAY, a post village in Digby co., N.S., on St. Marys Bay, 13 miles from Digby. Pop. 300.

ST. MARY'S FERRY, a post village in York co., N.B., on the River St John, and on the New Brunswick railway, opposite the city of Fredericton. Pop. 150.

ST. MARYS, Lincoln co., Ont. See Jordan.

ST. MATHIAS, a post village and parish in Rouville co., Que., on the Richelieu river, 8 miles from St. Hilairo Station. The village contains a church and several stores. Pop. 260; of parish 939.

ST. MATHIEU, a post village and parish in Rimouski co., Que., 42 miles below Riviere du Loup en Las. Pop. 896.

ST. MAURICE, a post village in Champlain co., Que., on the River St. Maurice. 10 miles from Three Rivers. It contains 3 saw mills, 2 grist mills, and 2 stores, and in the vicinity bog iron ore, peat and sand stone are found. Pop. 250.

ST. MAURICE FORGES, a post village in St. Maurice co., Que., on the River St. Maurice, 8 miles from Three Rivers. It contains a large foundry, where stoves are manufactured from bog iron ore found in the vicinity. Pod. 300.

ST. MICHAEL, Huntingdon co., Que. See Athelstan.

ST. MICHEL, a post village of Quebec, capital of the co. of Bellechasse, on the S. shore of the St. Lawrence, and on the G. T. R., 16 miles below Quebec. It contains, besides the county buildings, a church, convent, college, tannery, saw mill, and several stores, and has a large lumber trade. Pop. 700.

ST. MICHEL ARCHANGE, Napierville co., Que. See La Pigeonniere.

ST. MICHEL DES SAINTS, a post village in Berthier co., Que., on the River Mantawa, 60 miles from Juliette. It possesses good water privileges, and contains several saw and grist mills. Pop. 100.

ST. MODESTE, a post village and parish in Temiscouata co., Que., 9 miles from Cacouna. Pop. 1,124.

ST. MOISE, a post office in Rimouski co., Que.

ST. NARCISSE, a post village and parish in Champlain co., Que., 9 miles from Batiscan. It contains a church, 2 stores and a saw mill. Pop. 1,469.

ST. NICHOLAS, a thriving post village in Levis co. Que., on the S. shore of the St. Lawrence, 15 miles above Quebec. It contains saw and grist mills, 6 stores, and a telegraph office. Pop. 600.

ST. NORBERT, a post office in the district of Provencher, Man., on Red River, 9 miles from Fort Garry.

ST. NORBERT, a post village in Berthier co., Que., 13 miles from Berthier en limit, 54 miles N. of Montreal. It contains a grist mill and 2 stores. Pop. 200.

ST. NORBERT, Arthabaska co., Que. See East Arthabaska.

ST. OCTAVE, a post village in Rimouski co., Que., on the I. R., 3 miles from Metis. It contains 6 stores and a telegraph office.

ST. OLA, a post village in Hastings co., On!., CO miles back of Belleville. Pop. 100.

ST. ONEZIME, a post village in Kamouraska co., Que., 6miles from Ste. Anne de la Pocatiere. Pop. 200.


Lovell's Gazetteer of British North America, Edited by P.A. Crossby, 1873

 

Lovell's Gazetteer of British North America


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