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Tsattine Indians of Canada

Tsattine. Signifying "dwellers among the beavers." Also called:

Beaver Indians, English term derived from their own name.

Connections. The Tsattine belonged to the same branch of the Athapascan family as the Sekani and Sarcee.

Location. On the prairies south of Peace River and east of the Rocky Mountains and on the upper part of Peace River.

History. The Tsattine and the Sekani were originally one people, the separation having come about by the gradual penetration of the Sekani westward into the mountains. The Sarcee evidently branched off from the Beaver. The invasion of the Cree probably had something to do with all this. Some of the Indians of this tribe resorted to the Hudson's Bay Company's posts before there was a post in their own country. Mackenzie (1801) says that they first secured firearms in 1782. This was perhaps a result of the establishment of a post on Athabaska River by Peter Pond for the Northwest Company in 1778. It was abandoned a few years later and never rebuilt but other forts took its place, such as Athabaska Landing, Peace River Landing, Fort St. John, Fort Dunvegan, and a post on Little Slave Lake. Mackenzie spent the winter of 1792-93 with one band of Beaver near Peace River Crossing before setting out for the Pacific. Goddard (1916) states that they are now divided into three groups, one trading at Fort St. John, a second living about Dunvegan, and a third near Vermilion. There is also a large band at Hudson Hope.

The Indian Tribes of North of America, by John Swanton, 1953

Canadian Indians


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