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Kawchottine Indians of Canada

Kawchottine. Signifying "people of the great hares." Also called:

  Hare Indians, English appellation derived from their own name.
  Kkpayttchare ottiné, Chipewyan name.
  Nouga, Eskimo name, meaning "spittle."
  Peaux-de-Lièvres, French appellation from their own name.
  Rabbitskins, English appellation derived from their own name.

Connections. The Kawchottine belonged to the Athapascan linguistic family, being most intimately connected with the tribes higher up Mackenzie River.

Location. West and northwest of Great Bear Lake.

Subdivisions

Petitot (1893) gives the following:

Chintagottine, also called Katagottine, on Mackenzie River north of Fort Good Hope and between the river and 
  Great Bear Lake.
Etatchogottine, north and east of Great Bear Lake and on Great Cape.
Kawchogottine, on the border of the wooded region northeast of Fort Good Hope.
Kfwetragottine, south of Fort Good Hope along Mackenzie River.
Nellagottine, on Lake Simpson and along Anderson River.
Nigottine, also given as a part of the Kawchogottine, along the outlet of Great Bear Lake.
Satchotugottine, immediately north of Great Bear Lake, omitted from a later list.

History. The country of the Kawchottine was reached by Alexander Mackenzie in 1789. The establishment of Fort Good Hope in 1804 and Fort Norman in 1810 brought them in closer touch with Europeans, and the intimacy has increased steadily from that day to the present.

Population. Mooney (1928) estimated that there were 750 Kawchottine in 1670. In 1858 Ross (1858) gave their number as 467.

The Indian Tribes of North of America, by John Swanton, 1953

Canadian Indians


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