Canadian Genealogy| Canadian Indians

Canadian Indian Research

Indian Research

Tribes of Canada

Canadian Tribal Resources

Hydah Indians of Canada

Hudson Bay Territory

 

Canadian Research

Alberta

British Columbia

Manitoba

New Brunswick

Newfoundland

Northern Territories

Nova Scotia

Nanavut

Ontario

Prince Edward Island

Quebec

Saskatchewan

Yukon

Canadian Indian Tribes

 

Free Genealogy Forms
Family Tree Chart
Research Calendar
Research Extract
Free Census Forms
Correspondence Record
Family Group Chart
Source Summary

 

Other Websites
British Isles Genealogy
Australian Genealogy

 


FREE Web Site Hosting at
Canadian Genealogy

 

 

 

Haida Indians of Canada

Haida. Their own name, meaning "people."

Connections. The Haida constitute the Skittagetan linguistic family, the speech of which has certain structural resemblances with that of the Tlingit and Athapascans, with which Sapir (1915) combined it under the term Na-déné.

Location. Originally on the Queen Charlotte Islands, but early in the eighteenth century a part of the Haida settled on the southern part of Prince of Wales Island, Alaska, where they came to be known as Kaigani, from a summer camp where they were in the habit of gathering to meet trading vessels.

Subdivisions and Villages

The following are large local groups perhaps entitled to the appellation of tribes: Chaahl, on the northwest coast of Moresby Island.

Cumshewa, at the north entrance of Cumshewa Inlet, Moresby Island.
Dadens, on the south coast of North Island, fronting Parry Passage.
Gahlinskun, on the east coast of Graham Island, north of Cape Ball.
Haena, on the east end of Maude Island, Skidegate Inlet.
Hlielung, on the right bank of Hi-ellen River, at its mouth, Graham Island.
Howkan, on Long Island, Alaska, facing Dall Island.
Kaisun, on the northwest coast of Moresby Island.
Kasaan, on Skowl Arm of Kasaan Bay, east coast of Prince of Wales Island.
Kayung, on the east side of Masset Inlet just above Masset.
Kiusta, on the northwest coast of Graham Island, opposite North Island.
Klinkwan, on Cordova Bay, Prince of Wales Island, Alaska.
Kloo, at the east end of Tanoo Island.
Kung, at the mouth of Naden Harbor, Graham Island.
Kweundlas, on the west coast of Long Island, Alaska.
Masset, on the east coast of Masset Inlet near its entrance.
Naikun, Rose Spit or Nekoon, at the northeast angle of Graham Island.
Ninstints, on Anthony Island at the south end of Moresby Island.
Skedans, on a point of land which extends into Hecate Strait from the east end of Louise Island.
Skidegate, on the north shore of Skidegate Inlet near its entrance.
Sukkwan, on Cordova Bay, Alaska.
Tiun or Tigun, on the west coast of Graham Island south of Point Lewis.
Yaku, on the northwest coast of Graham Island opposite North Island.
Yan, on the west side of Masset Inlet near its mouth.
Small towns and camps so far as known are as follows:
Aiodjus, on the west side of Masset Inlet at its mouth.
Atana, on House or Atana Island off the east coast of Moresby Island.
Atanus, on the northeast coast of Hippa Island.
Chaahl, on the east coast of North Island.
Chatchini, near Kasaan, Prince of Wales Island.
Chets, on an island at the mouth of Tsooskahli, Masset Inlet.
Chuga, near Houston Stewart Channel and the town of Ninstints.
Chukeu, on the southwest coast of Moresby Island.
Dadjingits, on the north shore of Bearskin Bay, Skidegate Inlet.
Dahua, north of Lawn Hill at the mouth of Skidegate Inlet.
Daiyu, on Shingle Bay, east of Welcome Point, Moresby Island.
Djigogiga, legendary town on Copper Bay, Moresby Island.
Djigua, legendary town on the north shore of Cumshewa Inlet.
Djihuagits, on a creek just south of Rose Spit, Graham Island.
Edjao, around Edjao Hill at the east end of Masset Village.
Gachigundae, on the northeast shore of Alliford Bay, Moresby Island.
Gado, two towns:
  (1) traditional, on the south side of De la Beche Inlet, Moresby Island;
(2), on the east side of Lyell Island.
Gaedi, on the northeast shore of a small inlet just northeast of Houston Inlet.
Gaesigusket, on Murchison Island at a point opposite Hot Springs Island.
Gaiagunkun, legendary, near Hot Springs Island.
Gaodjaos, on the south shore of Lina Island, Bearskin Bay.
Gasins, on the northwest shore of Lina Island, Bearskin Bay.
Gatgainans, on Hippa Island.
Gitinkalana, on the north shore of Masset Inlet where it expands into the inner bay.
Guhlga, legendary, on the north shore of Skidegate Inlet one mile above Skidgate Village.
Gulhlgildjing, on the south shore of Alliford Bay, Moresby Island.
Gwaeskun, at Gwaeskun, the northernmost point on the Queen Charlotte Islands.
Hagi, on or near the largest of the Bolkus Islands.
Heudao, on the east side of Gull Point, Prevost Island.
Hlagi, on an island near the east end of Houston Stewart Channel.
Hlakeguns, on Yagun River at the Head of Masset Inlet.
Hlgadun, on Moresby Island facing Anthony Island.
Hlgaedlin, on the south side of Tanoo Island.
Hlgahet, near Skidegate.
Hlgai, at the head of Skedans Bay.
Hlgaiha, north of Dead Tree Point at the entrance of Skidegate Inlet.
Hlgaiu, south of Dead Tree Point at the entrance of Skidegate Inlet.
Hlgihla-ala, north of Cape Ball, on the east shore of Graham Island.
Hlkia, on the outer side of Lyell Island.
Hluln, in Naden Harbor.
Hotao, legendary, on the southwest coast of Maude Island.
Hotdjohoas, on Lyell Island near the north end of Darwin Sound.
Hoyagundla, on a stream of the same name a short distance south of Cape Fife.
Huados, near Hlgihla-ala, north of Cape Ball.
Kadadjans, on the northwest end of Anthony Island.
Kadusgo, at the mouth of a creek of the same name on Louise Island, flowing into Cumshewa Inlet from the south.
Kae, on Skotsgai Bay above Skidegate.
Kaidju, on Hewlett Bay, east coast of Moresby Island.
Kaidjudal, on Moresby Island opposite Hot Springs Island.
Kaigani, at the southeast end of Dall Island, Alaska.
Kasta, legendary, on Copper Bay, Moresby Island.
Katana, on Louise Island.
Kesa, on the west coast of Graham Island.
Ket, on Burnaby Strait, Moresby Island.
Kil, on Shingle Bay, Skidegate Inlet.
Koagoagit, on the north shore of Bearskin Bay.
Koga, on McKay Harbor, Cumshewa Inlet.
Kogalskun, on Masset Inlet.
Kostunhana, a short distance east of Skidegate.
Kundji, 2 towns:
  (1) legendary, on the south shore of Copper Bay, Moresby Island;
  (2), on the west side of Prevost Island.
Kungga, on the south shore of Dog Island.
Kungielung, on the west side of the entrance to Masset Inlet.
Kunhalas, just inside of Cumshewa Inlet.
Kunkia, on the north coast of North Island.
Kuulana, in Naden Harbor.
Lanadagunga, south of Tangle Cove, Moresby Island.
Lanagahlkehoda, on a small island opposite, Kaisun, Moresby Island.
Lanahawa, 2 towns:
  (1) on the west coast of Graham Island opposite Hippa Island;
(2) on the west coast of Burnaby Island south of Ket.
Lanahilduns, on the southwest side of Rennell Sound, Graham Island.
Lanaslnagai, 3 towns:
  (1) on the east coast of Graham Island south of Cape Ball,
(2) on the west side of Masset Inlet where the inner expansion begins;
(3) on Yagun River.
Lanaungsuls, on Masset Inlet.
Nagus, in an inlet on the southwest coast of Moresby Island.
Sahldungkun, on the west side of Yagun River at its mouth.
Sakaedigialas, traditional, on or near Kuper Island.
Sgilgi, in an inlet on the southwest coast of Moresby Island.
Sindaskun, near the south end of the islands.
Sindatahls, near Tsoo-skahli, an inner expansion of Masset Inlet.
Singa, on the north side of Tasoo Harbor, west coast of Moresby Island.
Skae, close to Cape St. James at the south end of the Queen Charlotte Islands.
Skaito, on the west coast of Moresby Island near Gold Harbor.
Skaos, at the entrance of Naden Harbor.
Skena, legendary, just south of Sand Spit Point, Moresby Island.
Skudus, on the north side of Lyell Island.
Stlindagwai, in an inlet on the west coast of Moresby Island.
Stunhlai, on the northwest coast of Moresby Island.
Sulustins, on the east coast of Hippa Island.
Ta, on the east coast of North Island.
Te, on the west coast of Graham Island opposite Frederick Island.
Tlgunghung, on the north side of Lyell Island.
Tlhingus, on Louise Island.
Tohlka, on the north coast of Graham Island just west of the entrance to Masset Inlet.
Widja, on the north coast of Graham Island just west of the entrance of Masset Inlet.
Yagun, on the north coast of Graham Island.
Yaogus, on the southwest side of Louise Island.
Yastling, in Naden Harbor, Graham Island.
Yatza, on the north coast of Graham Island between North Island and Virago Sound.
Youahnoe, given as a Kaigani town, perhaps identical with the town of Kaigani.

History. According to native traditions, the oldest Haida settlements were on the mainland side of the islands. The Haida towns in Alaska date back to the early part of the eighteenth century, i. e., their establishment was almost within the historic period. So far as is known, the Spanish Ensign Juan Perez in the corvette Santiago was the first white man to visit the islands. This was in the year 1774. In 1775 Bodega and Maurelle touched there. La Perouse coasted the shores of the group in 1786 and Dixon spent a month about them in 1787. He was followed by Douglas, Ingraham, Marchand, Vancouver, and numerous explorers and traders whose names have not been preserved. The Hudson's Bay Company located a post at Masset and mission stations were established at Masset and Skidegate by the Church of England and the Methodists respectively. Small pox, consumption, liquor, and immorality depleted the native population rapidly even before any Whites settled upon the islands, but the remnant of the people now seems to have reached an adjustment to the new conditions.

Population. Mooney (1928), estimated that in 1780 there were 8,000 Haida on the Queen Charlotte Islands and 1,800 in Alaska. A detailed enumeration made between 1836 and 1841 gave 6,593 and 1,735 respectively, a total of 8,328. Dawson (1880) thought that there were between 1,700 and 2,000 on the Queen Charlotte Islands and in 1888 the Canadian Office of Indian Affairs estimated 2,500, but the next year, when an actual census was taken of all but one settlement, the total was 637, and in 1894, when all were included, it was only 639. In 1895 there were reported 593; in 1902, 734; and in 1904, 587. In 1880 Petroff (1884) gave 788 Kaigani but Dall (1886) estimated 300. In 1890, 391 were returned and in 1905 the number was estimated as 300. The United States Census of 1910 gave 530; that of 1920, 524; and that of 1930, 588.

Connection in which they have become noted. The Haida have been noted for much the same things as the Tsimshian; beautiful carvings, peculiar social and ceremonial customs, and large and well-made dugouts. The slate from which so many artistic objects have been made is all obtained at one spot in their country. They are usually regarded as the typical totem-pole people.

The Indian Tribes of North of America, by John Swanton, 1953

Canadian Indians


Add/Correct a Link

Comments/Submit Data


Copyright 2002-2014 by Canadian Genealogy
The WebPages may be linked to but shall not be reproduced on another site without written permission.