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  Alberta
Alberta, the westernmost of Canada's 3 Prairie provinces, shares many physical features with its neighbors to the east, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Alberta was named after Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, 4th daughter of Queen Victoria.
  British Columbia
British Columbia is Canada's most westerly province. It is a mountainous area whose population is mainly clustered in the southwestern corner. The province is closely tied to the American Pacific Northwest.
  Manitoba
Manitoba is the province located in the heart of Canada. Created by the Manitoba Act of 1870, the province was at first a tiny rectangle comprising little more than the Red River Colony radiating from the juncture of the Red and Assiniboine rivers.
  New Brunswick
New Brunswick is one of 3 provinces collectively known as the "Maritimes." Joined to Nova Scotia by the narrow Chignecto Isthmus and separated from Prince Edward Island by the Northumberland Strait.
  Newfoundland / Labrador
Newfoundland is Canada's most easterly province. It is made up of two parts: the island of Newfoundland, and Labrador on the mainland of Canada.
  Nova Scotia
Nova Scotia is almost entirely surrounded by the sea. The sea affects almost every aspect of Nova Scotia, from the climate and economy to recreation.
  Northwest Territories
The name was originally applied to the territory acquired in 1870 from the Hudson's Bay Company and Great Britain - Rupert's Land and the North-Western Territory - which lay northwest of central Canada.
  Nunavut
Nunavut, which translates from the Inuktitut dialect of the Eastern Arctic Inuit as "Our Land," is a territorial subdivision of the erstwhile Northwest Territories.
  Ontario
Ontario is Canada's most populous, richest and second-largest province. The name Ontario, from an Iroquoian word sometimes translated as meaning "beautiful lake" or "beautiful water,"
  Prince Edward Island
Prince Edward Island is the smallest of Canada's ten provinces in both size and population. Referred to by its people as "the Island."
  Quebec
Quebec is Canada's largest province by area and the second-largest in population. The name Quebec comes from an Algonquian word meaning "where the river narrows."
  Saskatchewan
Saskatchewan is the central Prairie Province, lying between Alberta and Manitoba. Saskatchewan is derived from an anglicized version of a Cree word denoting a swiftly flowing river.
  Yukon
The Yukon is one of Canada's two northern territories. Yukon Territory takes its name from the Loucheux Native name Yu-kun-ah for the "great river" which drains most of its area.

Canadian Indians
Names and locations of the Indian tribes of Canada from Indian Tribes of North America by John Swanton.

Welcome to Canadian Genealogy

Canadian Genealogy is the Host for AHGP Canada


Canadian Indian Tribes (Present Day) Updated and enlarged

Forts of Acadia
Memorials of the days of the French regime throughout the Provinces which were once comprised within the ill-defined and extensive limits of Acadia, and are now known as Nova Scotia and New Brunswick

Chronicles of Canada Updated
22 volumes of the 36 volume set
That early history of Canada, from the aboriginal beginnings up until Post-Confederation Canada,
are detailed in the 36 volume set "Chronicles of Canada."

Gazetteer of British North America

Heroines of Canadian History

Indian Residents, Middlesex County, Canada, 1580-1888

Arcadians Expelled from Cobequid, Nova Scotia

Canada-Canadians
 The total change of life for the immigrant in their adopted home of Canada.

Fenian Raids of 1866 and 1870
One of the most dangerous and critical periods in the history of Canada...

The Micmac Indians At Bay D'Espoir
Governor's report on a visit to the Micmac Indians

Astoria or Anecdotes of an Enterprise beyond the Rocky Mountains
Canada, Northwest Fur Company, and many Indian tribes

The Jesuits in North America in the Seventeenth Century
Few passages of history are more striking than those which record the efforts of the earlier French Jesuits to convert the Indians.

Mound Builders
Ours are the only mounds making up a distinct mound-region on Canadian soil. This comes to us as a part of the large inheritance which we who have migrated to Manitoba receive.

Passamawquoddy Folklore
The study of aboriginal folk-lore cannot reach its highest scientific value until some method is adopted by means of which an accurate record of the stories can be obtained and preserved.

Indian Linguistic Families of America North of Mexico 

The Canada Directory
A directory of the towns and post offices in Canada
Complete

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